baked

the ultimate food high

3 Non-Culinary Uses For Coconut Oil

We’ve all heard of coconut oil—edible oil extracted from the kernel or meat of mature coconuts—and how using it in our meals can have great health benefits such as fat loss and better brain function. Lucky for our beauty routines, coconut oil’s benefits extend far beyond nutrition. Read on for ways to incorporate the oil into your life—no oven or stovetop in sight.

coconut-oil

Skin

Use: Coconut oil can be used with your lotion, deodorant, lip balm, tanning oil, sunscreen, and facial moisturizer. Combining it with these products can help to lighten age spots and soften skin. If you apply it consistently, it can reduce the appearance of scars and cellulite—and even be used to treat acne.

Application: Apply the coconut oil after you’ve washed or showered so it can be absorbed fully. When it’s been absorbed, you can add some of the oil to a bath and soak in the tub.

Hair

Use: Coconut oil can be added to your conditioner or simply applied to your hair for softness and shine. It can also get rid of dandruff and frizz and, when rubbed onto the scalp, stimulate hair growth.

Application: When applying coconut oil it’s best to warm the oil (you can do this in the microwave) and allow it to cool before applying. Next, pour it on top of your head and massage it from your roots to the ends of your hair. Once the oil is soaked into your hair, cover and let sit for at least 2 hours (you can sleep with it in your hair if preferred). Wash your hair after treatment.

Nails

Use: Moisturizing both your fingernails and toenails with coconut oil can strengthen nails, soften cuticles, and stimulate nail growth when applied on cuticles.

Application: Wash hands with soap and water before applying the coconut oil.

Janelle Bio

Advertisements

About Baked Magazine

Baked is Syracuse University’s student-run food magazine. Founded in 2011, Baked aims to widen food options for SU students by introducing kitchen amateurs to cooking, highlighting local businesses and eateries, and connecting readers to the greater Syracuse food community. It publishes one issue each semester.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on 09/20/2014 by in DIY and tagged , , , .
%d bloggers like this: