baked

the ultimate food high

Where To Eat For The Jewish High Holidays

The holidays are here! No, I’m not confusing my seasons. The Jewish High Holidays, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, come every fall and bring delicious food that no one should miss. Challah, honey and apples, kosher dill pickles, matzo ball soup, bagels and lox…the list goes on and on. Whether you’re ending Yom Kippur by breaking the fast—the best time to enjoy a steamy bowl of matzo ball soup—or just enjoy a good challah, these are the best places to get your Jewish cuisine during the High Holidays (or anytime!) in Syracuse.

brooklyn-pickle

Corned beef sandwich from The Brooklyn Pickle

Homemade kosher dill pickles, giant deli sandwiches, and assorted soups and salads at The Brooklyn Pickle make this New York-style deli a must. Try the corned beef on pumpernickel with Thousand Island dressing.

Locations at 2222 Burnet Avenue and 1600 West Genesee Street

jelly-donut

Sufganiyot from Harrison Bakery

Harrison Bakery sells the best challah Syracuse has to offer, and makes a special round version for Rosh Hashanah. Stop in, grab a challah, and be sure to try other favorites made just like Bubbe’s: sweet, powdery sufganiyots (jelly doughnuts), rugelach, and more.

1306 West Genesee Street

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Challah from Harrison Bakery

If you’re in the mood for friendly people and kosher eats, Syracuse University’s Hillel is the place to go. During the High Holidays, Hillel serves up everything from matzo ball soup to brisket to lox and bagels and is always stocked with fresh loaves of challah. Use your SU meal plan or SUpercard for a delicious Shabbat dinner made in Hillel’s own kosher kitchen on any Friday night around 7:15. RSVP for meals here—you don’t have to be Jewish, I promise!

102 Walnut Place

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About Baked Magazine

Baked is Syracuse University’s student-run food magazine. Founded in 2011, Baked aims to widen food options for SU students by introducing kitchen amateurs to cooking, highlighting local businesses and eateries, and connecting readers to the greater Syracuse food community. It publishes one issue each semester.

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This entry was posted on 10/01/2014 by in JOINTS and tagged , , , , .
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